DICKINSTEIN

Dickinstein2Emily Dickinson is not only one of America’s best known poets, but she was also a peculiar individual. Known for being a recluse, history has taught us she spent her time alone in her room composing the superlative and haunting poems she is known for today.

But did Emily spend all her time writing poetry?  No. She was giving life back to the dead.

After her “first friend” and mentor, Benjamin Newton, gives the teenage Emily a first edition of the novel Frankenstein, Emily begins to obsess over giving the dead a “second life.” Inspired by a classroom experiment demonstrated by her biology professor, Leonard Humphrey, Emily begins to build a small apparatus in her room which will grant a second life to small dead animals.

And it works!

When Humphrey learns of Emily’s success, he encourages her to give him the secret to her life-giving apparatus. Emily is hesitant at first, until she learns that her dear friend Newton has passed away.  Emily is distraught because she did not get to say good-bye.

But then she meets the alluring Reverend Wadsworth, who teaches Emily that our own immortality is not of this earth.  Or is it?

Will Emily succumb to science?  Will her desire to see Newton one last time prove to be too strong?  Or will Emily’s faith ultimately prevail?

Find out why Emily became the poetic recluse she’s known as today in the new novel by Shannon Yarbrough. Dickinstein will be published in October 2013 by Rocking Horse Publishing. Check back soon for more details.

June 2016 UPDATE:  Last October my 2 year contract with my publisher came to an end and I decided to take back the rights to Dickinstein so it has been out of print since then.  I am about to start working on a 2nd edition of the book myself which will have a new title and a new cover. I hope to have the new edition out by the end of the year.

8 comments on “DICKINSTEIN

  1. Pingback: Dickinstein: Editing and Feedback | The Lone Writer: Shannon Yarbrough

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  8. Pingback: Changing History – Emily Dickinson and Dickinstein – Fact or Fiction? | The Lone Writer: Shannon Yarbrough

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